Language Matters

Kathleen Stein Smith, Ph.D

Monthly Archives: March 2015

Scandinavia Easter Traditions & Easter Customs

“Travel to Scandinavia during the Easter holidays and find countries filled with the spring’s energy. Everywhere, you can see colorful Easter decorations like painted eggs and chickens, lovingly created by young and old. Find out more how the Scandinavian country of your choice celebrates the Easter holidays, with their own traditions and customs!”

Read more @ http://goscandinavia.about.com/od/annualeventstraditions/a/easterhub.htm

Languages do matter!

Easter Markets in Eastern Europe

“Easter markets in Eastern Europe provide a great opportunity to enjoy Easter celebrations, traditions, food, and crafts. Purchase special seasonal souvenirs like Easter eggs and observe folk performances. Warmer weather attracts springtime crowds.”

Read more @ http://goeasteurope.about.com/od/easterneuropedestinations/tp/eastermarketseasterneurope.htm

Languages do matter!

Earth Hour 2015: World cities go dark for climate change

“The lights went out at some of the world’s most famous landmarks on Saturday evening in aid of the Earth Hour environmental awareness campaign

Cities around the world have been temporarily plunged into darkness to raise awareness about climate change.

Millions of people across the globe switched off their lights for an hour at 8.30pm local time in support of the WWF’s Earth Hour initiative.

Read more @ http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/earth/earthvideo/11502038/Earth-Hour-2015-World-cities-go-dark-for-climate-change.html

Languages do matter!

These are Britain’s most agreeable places. Hint: London’s not one of them

“London is one of the most cosmopolitan cities in the world, known for a dynamism and multitude of cultures that make the British capital quite distinct from the rest of the country. But is it agreeable? Apparently not.

Researchers at the University of Cambridge used BBC data to analyze a sample of just under 400,000 people from England, Wales, and Scotland, to determine the “personalities” of different parts of the nation. One of the criteria was very British—agreeableness, defined as co-operation, friendliness and trust.

The most agreeable regions? Scotland, as well as the North, the South West, and East of England.”

Read more @ http://qz.com/369831/these-are-britains-most-agreeable-places-hint-londons-not-one-of-them/

Languages do matter!

This animated map shows how European languages evolved

“The origin of Indo-European languages has long been a topic of debate among scholars and scientists.

In 2012, a team of evolutionary biologists at the University of Auckland led by Dr. Quentin Atkinson released a study that found all modern IE languages could be traced back to a single root: Anatolian — the language of Anatolia, now modern-day Turkey.”

Read more @ http://www.businessinsider.com/animated-map-displays-spread-european-language-europe-russia-asia-history-2015-3

Languages do matter!

9 basic concepts Americans fail to grasp

“In the Netherlands or the Scandinavian countries, becoming proficient in two or three foreign languages is viewed as a sign of intellect and sophistication.

Barack Obama, during his 2008 campaign, was bombarded with hateful responses from Republicans when he recommended that Americans study foreign languages from an early age. And in the 2012 GOP presidential primary, Newt Gingrich’s campaign ran an ad in South Carolina attacking Mitt Romney for being proficient in French.”

Read more @ http://www.salon.com/2015/03/28/9_basic_concepts_americans_fail_to_grasp_partner/

Languages do matter!

Easter in Germany

“Easter is one of the most popular holidays in Germany; after a cold and long German winter, Easter marks the eagerly anticipated season of spring.

In the weeks prior to Easter, Germany gets ready for a new season: You will see spring flowers on display and many traditional ‘Easter trees’, twigs and brushes dripping with colorfully decorated eggs. The custom of boiling and painting eggs, the symbols of new life, began in Germany; the bright colors represent sunlight and growth.

Next to the Easter egg, the rabbit is probably the most popular Easter icon.

Germans enjoy a very long Easter weekend: Good Friday and Easter Monday are public holidays.

German schools are closed for Easter holidays (usually two weeks around the Easter weekend), and many Germans travel during these days.

Easter Sunday is the highlight of the holiday weekend. In the early morning, parents hide baskets filled with colored, hardboiled eggs, chocolate bunnies, sweets, and little presents for the kids. Many families attend an Easter service, followed by a traditional Easter lunch, lamb, potatoes, and fresh vegetables.

Read more @ http://gogermany.about.com/od/eventsandfestivals/a/easteringermany.htm

Languages do matter!

A guide to celebrating a traditional Irish Easter

“Preparation for Easter Sunday starts at the beginning of Lent and culminates with a gathering of family and friends and everyone’s favorite food, usually chocolates or whatever other vice was given up for the Lenten period, is eaten.”

Read more @ http://www.irishcentral.com/roots/how-the-traditional-irish-easter-was-celebrated-120536204-237383821.html#

Languages do matter!

Easter in Eastern Europe

Easter in Eastern Europe and East Central Europe is an enormously important holiday.

Easter in Eastern Europe is celebrated with special foods, Easter markets, Easter festivals, the decorating of Easter Eggs, and church services. If you happen to travel to the countries in Eastern Europe during this springtime event, you should be aware of some of the local traditions so you can enjoy them all the more.

Read more @ http://goeasteurope.about.com/od/easterneuropedestinations/a/eastereasterneurope.htm

Languages do matter!

Easter celebrations around the world